The Complicated Nature of Freight Shipping and Why it Helps to Have a Partner

When a lot of people think of “shipping,” they simply think of ordering a product from an online retailer, and then selecting whether they want it express over-nighted, standard three-day shipping or within five to seven days from the purchase. And while that may be the norm for shipping as it pertains to ordering a lot of consumer goods from big box store websites as well as online retailers, it’s hardly the case when it comes to getting large, commercial equipment from its point of purchase to its purchaser. That’s a whole other animal.

Yes, when you’re dealing with the likes of pallets, skids, crates, wraps, international shipping codes and customs – not to mention other intangibles and logistics involved in transporting commercial equipment – things have a tendency to get a bit dicey and expensive for the customer. Yes, it should go without saying that freight shipping has the potential to be a nightmare. It’s a process that can be so complicated that it can take a lot of the buzz out of purchasing a new piece of commercial equipment for your company or manufacturing site. But working with a quality, reliable and efficient freight shipping partner can take a lot of – if not all of – the hassle out of this all-important transportation process. In this post, we’ll take a look at why freight shipping has a tendency to cause headaches, and better help you understand the value of a quality shipping partner.

The Cost

One of the biggest headaches associated with freight shipping is none other than the costs to do it – especially when these costs change, which is certainly something that has a tendency to happen. Why are costs such a headache? There are so many different options when it comes to moving commercial equipment from Point A to Point B, from packaging options to ways the equipment can be shipped:

  • Packaging Types: Pallets, skids, skeleton crates and full crates are four of the most popular packaging types when it comes to transporting commercial equipment. Depending on the product in question, each has their own place. Pallets offer the least amount of product protection, but they are also the cheapest packaging option. Skids are essentially custom pallets, and skeleton crates are skids with additional wood framing. The most secure type of packaging for a commercial piece of equipment is a full crate, which essentially is a wooden box with a skid-type bottom that’s built around the product.
  • Types of Shipping: Aside from how the product is packaged, there’s also the means of transportation it must take to get to the end user. There are a variety of different transportation options, all of which vary in cost and speed. Here’s an overlook:
    • LTL: LTL, or less than truckload, shipment is best for smaller freight. This method is normally fairly fast, but where it really scores big points is in how affordable it is. However, items transported this way must be skidded and covered with some sort of protective packaging.
    • Blanket Wrap: These types of shipments don’t usually require a skid or crate.
    • Ocean: Items shipped by sea must be specially packed into ocean containers, which can raise costs. Even after they’re stored in these special ocean containers, they must be packaged similar to equipment being shipped LTL.
    • Air Shipment: The nice thing about freight air shipments is that they are normally twice as fast as ocean or truck shipments. The bad news about shipment by air is that these shipments are also about double the price and there are also sizing restrictions, meaning each item in question must be analyzed on a case-by-case basis.
    • Other Shipping: Logistics van shipment and flatbed shipment are two other shipping types that involve transporting items in trailers.

You paid enough for your product, why pay a ton more to ship it to your location? That’s the value of a freight shipping partner, as a quality one can help you choose the right shipping method and packaging for your situation and your piece of equipment.

International Shipping Challenges

Having an item shipped domestically is one thing – having it shipped internationally is a whole different thing. For instance, any commercial freight going in or out of the United States – or any country for that matter – will have to clear customs. Do you have customs clearance? A quality shipping partner works with a customs broker to help streamline this process.

Then, there are what’s called “Incoterms,” or international commercial terms. If you’re not an international shipping expert, you’re likely going to struggle to understand these and just what type of impact they have on transporting purchased equipment to your facility.

Finally, just from Incoterms and customs clearance, you can probably guess that international shipping is complicated. But another way that international shipping can complicate things is when it comes to the invoice – specifically, mistakes on the invoice. That’s another value of a good freight shipping partner, as they’ll take a final look at international shipping invoices to make sure that everything checks out.

Other Challenges a Freight Partner Can Help Solve

Aside from the packaging type and shipment type – which play a role in overall cost – and juggling the international shipping logistics, there are a variety of other challenges that a good freight shipping partner can help overcome. For instance:

  • Freight Class: Do you know what freight class the product falls under? Before you can ship, this must be determined.
  • Qualified Carriers: Whether by air, land or sea, it’s also important to find qualified and professional carriers. A good shipping partner only does business with the best carriers, so you can trust that your product will be delivered on time and in good condition.
  • Insurance: What are your liability limits on your shipments? Will it be enough in the event that the unthinkable were to happen?
  • Transit times: Is your product arriving in the appropriate amount of time?

 

As you can see, a good freight partner can help resolve a lot of logistical issues that deal with price, transportation and international hassles. And here at Bid on Equipment, we’re pleased to work with a great freight shipping partner who will provide you with free shipping quotes based on the weight and dimensions of your purchase. They’re also pleased to help you manage any other obstacles that have the potential to pop up throughout the process of getting the equipment from Point A to Point B.

For more information, contact Bid on Equipment today.

What to Look for When Purchasing a Commercial Meat Grinder

Meat grinders are essential tools in any home kitchen, restaurant, commercial processing facility or other facility that has a desire to chop, mix or process meat. In a nutshell, a meat grinder is an appliance that replaces a mincing knife, making the task of meat processing much more efficient.

The origins of the meat grinder date all the way back to the 19th century by a German revolutionist. These early grinders were hand cranked and forced the meat into a metal plate that was dotted with several holes, which thereby processed thin, long strands of meat. As time moved on and as technology improved, much of the manual hand cranking involved with these older meat grinders was eventually replaced with electricity.

The meat grinder is still used today, commercially in the likes of restaurants. But today’s meat grinder is a far cry from the early days of the grinder. Today, there are many options and features to choose from when it comes to grinders of the commercial variety. This post is designed to provide more insight and analysis on just what you should be looking for when you’re in the market to purchase a new commercial meat grinder.

What type of meat grinder do I need?

As we noted earlier, meat grinders have come a long way since they were first invented in the 19th century. Today, there are three main types of meat grinders: manual grinders, standalone grinders and grinder attachments. We’ll briefly examine these types below:

  • Manual grinders: Similar to the original meat grinder, a manual grinder fittingly requires the user to turn a crank or a lever to process the meat. Typically, these types of grinders are best suited for environments where there isn’t a need to process large amounts of meat. It’s also best utilized in areas of the country where electricity might not be readily available. Most manual grinders are made from cast iron steel and some are even coated in aluminum or other metals.
  • Standalone grinders: Standalone grinders are those that are most synonymous with commercial industry, mainly for the fact that they are electrically powered. For this reason, standalone grinders are also commonly known as “electric meat grinders.” Because they’re so automated, they’re best utilized in environments which have to process large quantities of meat. While they’re more expensive than a manual grinder, they also come with more plate options for grinding and processing different types of meats.
  • Grinder attachments: These typically are more suited to the household market than to the commercial one in that these are grinder attachments that connect and work with other kitchen devices, such as food processors and mixers.

Do you need a conventional grinder or a frozen one?

While we already covered the three main types of grinders in the above section, there are various sub categories of grinders as it pertains to their capabilities. For instance, some grinders are just designed to grind and process thawed meat, while others are designed to process frozen meat. These “frozen” meat grinders are able to process blocks of meat in temperatures as low as negative 25 degrees Celsius. Before purchasing a meat grinder, be sure you know whether or not you’ll need it to work with frozen or thawed meat (or both).

Do I need my grinder to do anything special?

We already covered one special task that you need to know whether or not you need your meat grinder to accomplish in the processing of frozen meat, but there are a few other special things that you need to keep in mind. For instance, one other task that many want their meat grinders to be able to do is process bone, soft bone to be specific. Some meat grinders are able to do this, others are not able to do this. So if your restaurant or commercial facility deals with the likes of prime rib or other meats that might include a soft bone, you’re likely going to want to choose a model that’s able to process this. It’s another thing to take into consideration.

How much meat do I need to process?

Just how much meat do you need to process? The answer to this question will more or less dictate what type of grinder you’re going to want to acquire. For instance, as we covered above, if you don’t process a lot of meat, you can probably get away with buying a manual grinder. But if you process a lot of meat, an electric grinder is almost always the right way to go. Generally speaking, the more meat you’ll need to process, the bigger the motor you’ll need on your meat processor. You wouldn’t attempt to tow a boat in a sedan vehicle now would you? No, you’d select the truck or SUV for that. Think of meat grinders similarly. If you’re only looking to make a batch of hamburgers every now and then, you don’t need a very powerful meat grinder. But if you’re processing all kinds of meats and crafting all different kinds of foods, make sure you’re purchasing a meat grinder with the ability to handle such capacity.

What’s my budget?

Last but not least, there’s the aspect of cost when it comes to the purchase of a commercial meat grinder. There’s always the challenge of acquiring a product that is able to fit within the budget you’ve set aside for it. Meat grinders are hardly the most expensive piece of equipment that you’ll likely need in your restaurant or commercial facility, but they can still put a decent dent in the wallet, as they range in price anywhere from several hundred dollars to several thousand dollars. While many businesses can absorb these costs, many others are looking for a more affordable upfront cost, especially those who are just opening a restaurant. For these businesses, buying from a credible, reliable source such as Bid on Equipment could be the best route to take. Because of the turnover rate of the restaurant and food business, Bid on Equipment regularly receives lightly used grinders that it is able to turn around and sell for a fraction of the like-new price.

 

There is a lot to consider when it comes to the purchase of a new commercial meat grinder, from style to additional features and, of course, to price. But price should never be something that stands in the way of you and the equipment you need. That’s where we come in at Bid on Equipment. Visit our website to browse our selection of meat grinders today.

November 2015 Trends Report

What has been bringing buyers to Bid on Equipment through the month of November and what are they looking for when they are here? This last month we noticed a large increase in interest in Meat Equipment including Meat Grinders, Meat Preparation Equipment, and Breakdown Meat Equipment.
 
Below are the top ten search terms that have shown the largest increases from Internet search traffic this month.

 

Interest in each of these terms has grown 100% – 2000%!

Used Woodworking Tools For Sale Restaurant Equipment For Sale
Bakery Equipment For Sale Used Dairy Equipment
Used Meat Processing Equipment Used Machine Shop Equipment
Used Boilers For Sale Used Meat Grinder
Used Printing Equipment Bakery Oven For Sale
 
The top ten overall categories for Bid on Equipment in the last month.
Woodworking Equipment Boilers
Bakery Equipment Tanks
Machine Shop and Tools Lathes
Dairy Equipment Meat Equipment
Restaurant Equipment Welding Equipment
 
The top ten overall Manufacturer Pages for Bid on Equipment in the last month.
Sweco Combi
Cleaver Brooks Hussman
Bakers Pride Multivac
Miller Alto Shaam
Waukesha Bosch

 

Everything you Need to Know About Industrial Mixers

In the kitchen, a mixer is a simple, yet essential, tool that serves as a baking instrument. But there’s a whole other world of mixers out there beyond what you may find in a kitchen. While you’re likely more familiar with these household mixtures, mixers are also developed on a much grander scale for industrial applications – hence they’re given the name “industrial mixers.” They operate similarly to the types of household mixers that you’re likely more used to using, but they are also much more complicated and intricate when it comes to their applications and uses.

This post will take a closer look at these industrial mixers, including what they’re used for, what specifically they do, the various different types of them and more. Just think of it as Industrial Mixers 101:

What do industrial mixers do?

Simply put, industrial mixers do the same types of things that household mixtures do – just with larger volumes of materials. Specifically, industrial mixers are used to either mix or blend materials used to create products for several different industries, including food, chemical, pharmaceutical, plastic and mineral. In this sense, industrial mixers differ from the mixers used in homes in that they’re used to create product for several industries beyond just edible product. As we noted in the opening, there’s a wide world of applications for industrial mixers.

What industries are industrial mixers used in?

We already mentioned food, chemical, pharmaceutical, plastic and mineral, but there are several more notable industries that are worth noting. These include biotechnology, oil, biofuels, water treatment and paints and coatings. When you think about mixers and blenders, they truly have a role in a great number of industries – and they’re being applied to more and more industries and products as we speak.

What types of materials do industrial mixers mix?

Industrial mixers are able to blend a variety of solids, gases and liquids, or a combination of each. In terms of solids, they typically blend powders to homogenize bulk materials. Mixing is usually completed in either single-phase or multi-phase formats.

Do industrial mixers look like household mixers?

To a certain extent, yes. That’s largely because industrial mixers and household mixers both serve the same basic function of either mixing or blending product, so there’s the use of blades and other tooling to get the job done. However, the big way in which industrial mixers differ from household ones is in their size. For instance, while household mixers are generally small enough to fit on a kitchen countertop or be placed into the palm of your hand, industrial mixers range from the small side to the very large side. These smaller mixers are typically used in laboratory environments where as the large, production-sized mixers are used just for that – production – and little to nothing else. Furthermore, some mixer models are available to process just a few pints of product, while others are able to process up to several hundred or several thousand gallons worth of product. Industrial mixers are commonly made from stainless steel or some other type of high-strength, durable metal.

How many different types of industrial mixers are there?

There are dozens of types of industrial mixers and blenders. Here’s a list of some of the more popular types:

  • Ribbon blender
  • V blender
  • Continuous processor
  • Double cone blender
  • Jet mixer
  • Mobile mixers
  • Drum blenders
  • Planetary mixer
  • Screw blender

In particular, let’s focus on the planetary mixer for a moment. These types of mixers work with a variety of round products, such as adhesives, pharmaceuticals, foods, electronics, plastics and pigments. Blades on a planetary mixer rotate on their own axes, and simultaneously on common axis, thereby enabling these types of industrial mixers to complete their tasks in a short period of time.

Another type of mixer that we didn’t mention on the list above is the Banbury mixer, which is used to mix compounding rubber and plastics. These types of mixers have spiral shaped blades enclosed in cylindrical shaped housings, which helps to reduce labor and costs when blending and mixing product.

What types of accessories are industrial mixers/blenders often outfitted with?

Because industrial mixers serve so many different industries and help produce so many different end products, it’s only fitting that they’re also commonly outfitted with a variety of add-ons and accessories. For instance, external or internal heating systems are often added to this type of equipment. Spray nozzles, and pneumatic systems and electric systems are also often added to ensure smooth starts and stops in the mixing and blending process.

How much do industrial mixers cost?

There are a lot of different types of industrial mixers, and these various types often differ in size, complexity and other aspects. On that note, it probably won’t surprise you to learn that industrial mixers vary in price based on their type and size. For instance, this price range can span several hundred dollars to several thousand dollars for an individual unit. While this may not seem like a large sum of money, for startup businesses or companies looking to expand their operations, acquiring these mixers are often a tolerated inconvenience that comes with the job at hand. And for many entities, several thousand dollars might not be in the cards at that point in time. That’s where an outlet like Bid on Equipment can come in handy, as previously owned equipment, like industrial mixers, are purchased and then resold for a fraction of the retail price. It can provide a business with that all-important costs savings when money is tight, yet production is imminent. And quality won’t be sacrificed, as pre-owned mixers are still adequate enough to get the job done and meet worksite expectations.

As you can see, industrial mixers play a large role in many different industries and are available in a plethora of shapes, sizes and styles in order to meet any application. For more information on industrial mixers, and to browse the vast selection of mixers and blenders contact Bid on Equipment today.

Be a Part of the U.S. Manufacturing Resurgence

The United States has a long history of manufacturing excellence, from the railroads to the automobile and much, much more. But over the years, companies began outsourcing manufacturing operations overseas, largely due to cheaper labor. And when the “great recession” hit between 2007 and 2009, manufacturing took a big hit in the United States. Factories closed, two of the “big three” domestic automakers filed for bankruptcy protection and many skilled workers were laid off from their positions as output dwindled.

Needless to say, but it wasn’t a good time for manufacturing.

Years later, manufacturing is coming back in this country – and coming back with a vengeance. Are you planning to be a part of the resurgence?

Before you answer that question, let’s take a look at how manufacturing is back on the rise, and just how important it is to the U.S. economy:

  • It’s estimated that every single manufacturing job creates about three additional jobs in other sectors.
  • For every $1 of goods that manufacturing produces, an additional $1.48 is generated for the economy. That’s believed to be the highest multiplier of any U.S. economic sector.
  • If you eliminated all other sources of the U.S. economy, just manufacturing alone would be good enough to make it the 10th largest economy in the world.
  • It’s estimated that manufacturing produces $1.8 trillion worth of revenue each year, or roughly 12.2 percent of the U.S.’s total gross domestic product (GDP).
  • Nearly half of all U.S. exports (47 percent, to be exact) are a byproduct of manufacturing.

That’s a look at how important manufacturing is to the U.S. economy, but it’s worth noting that jobs in this sector are highly regarded as well. It’s estimated that the average manufacturing worker is paid $77,000 per year. The vast majority of these jobs also include medical benefits and are among the most highly tenured in the entire job market. And as manufacturers reduce outsourcing and offshoring and begin to bring operations back domestically, the number of manufacturing jobs will likely only continue to grow.

Today, it’s estimated that there’s some 12 million manufacturing jobs in the United States. It’s a far cry from the estimated 17 million that there were in the early 1990s, but as we’ve mentioned already in this post, that number is increasing and will continue to increase as operations improve and expand.

So, we’ll pose the question again – do you want to be a part of the manufacturing resurgence in America?

Here’s a look at why manufacturing is coming back:

  • High global demand: It’s simple economics – supply and demand. The economy is improving, and so is the demand for American-made products. When there’s demand, someone has to supply it – and product demand is music to a manufacturer’s ears.
  • No more outsourcing? OK, so outsourcing may still be going on – but it is not like it was in previous years. That’s because it isn’t so much of a cost savings to outsource production to China anymore, as wages have jumped in the Asian nation. That means more companies are moving production back domestically, which is obviously good news for manufacturing in the U.S.
  • Attracting other nations: Not long ago, it was the U.S. outsourcing labor to China and other countries. Now, many foreign countries are actually recognizing the benefits of U.S. labor and outsourcing their operations to the United States.

To be a part of this manufacturing resurgence, however, you can’t just open a shop and expect things to take off on their own. In addition to needing the right people to work in your operations, you also need the right equipment to help streamline operations and produce product. The latter isn’t always as easy as it seems. That’s because product development is tough. And when a potential customer or product end user has certain expectations for how a product will perform and what types of things it will do over time, you have to have the knowledge and know-how to take the product from its concept stage to its manufacturing stage. In between, there’s the design stage, engineering stage and prototyping stage of product development.

Yes, there are challenges in taking a product from concept to production. And even with the right people and equipment, there’s still risk involved. So just how do you go about minimizing risk and streamlining operations, while keeping time to market on point? Here’s a look:

    • Lower the financial commitment: No, we’re not talking about underpaying your staff or cutting corners when it comes to the quality of your product – we’re talking about saving some money while you get your manufacturing operations kick-started or expanded by investing in previously owned equipment. At credible previously owned equipment outlets such as Bid on Equipment, we have a variety of lathes, CNC machines, rapid prototyping systems, milling machines and turning machines that are like new in every way but the price. Let’s face it, with production equipment ranging upwards into the hundreds of thousands of dollars, starting production or expanding production capability isn’t exactly something that’s simple to do. That’s why buying previously owned equipment can behoove a company in such a position – not only are they saving money when it comes to overhead costs, but they’re also reducing the risk involved in doing so.

 

  • Partner with a broker: A good broker can pay big dividends when it comes to manufacturing. How? By assisting you with the planning and development of your operations versus you going about it blindly and attempting to plan things on your own. To review, a broker is an individual who buys and sells goods, or in this case equipment, for others. Brokers can also arrange or negotiate plans or deals with others. Bottom line – a good broker can be a huge asset to your manufacturing operations by reducing risk and, ideally, saving you money.

To be or not to be… a part of the U.S. manufacturing resurgence, that is the question. It’s a booming field right now, which certainly makes it an attractive one. But it’s not an industry that is easily mastered. That’s why it’s important to surround yourself with people who know what they’re doing and equipment that you can rely on, whether you’re expanding your capacity and operations to produce more or you’re starting up manufacturing operations altogether.

So are you planning to be a part of the resurgence? Make sure you know what you’re doing, or what you’re getting in to. For more information, and to browse a wide variety of equipment, contact Bid on Equipment today.

The World’s Largest Conveyors

Image credits: jbdodane/Flickr

By definition, conveyors are pieces of equipment that move materials or objects from one place to another place, from Point A to Point B. You’ll commonly find them in the likes of packaging plants, material handling facilities and auto shops – or really any place that requires the transportation of materials that are particularly large and heavy and would be otherwise difficult and inefficient to move by hand. But they’re found elsewhere around the world as well, which we’ll get to in a bit.

Conveyors are so widely used because of the many benefits they offer, such as:

  • The safe transportation of objects or materials.
  • They’re able to move materials and objects of all different shapes and sizes, so virtually everything is applicable.
  • They come in different varieties, and can be powered by many different means.
  • They can be easily and safely installed almost anywhere.

Focus on that last point for a moment – they can be installed almost anywhere. This is largely because they can be easily customized to adjust to the environment or setting that they need to be used in. On that note, it probably shouldn’t surprise you to learn that conveyors of all different sizes are out there, from the small to the very large. We decided it would be fun to take a look at the latter types of conveyors – the big ones. Just think of them as the largest of their kind in the world. Here’s a look.

The World’s Largest Conveyors

  • India: It’s hard to really pinpoint a location for this massive conveyor, so we’ll just say that it transports limestone from a crushing mine some 35 kilometers away to a Bangladesh cement shop in India. Once considered to be the longest conveyor belt of its time when commissioned in 2005, it is built on and supported by trestles. In addition to the belt running 35 kilometers in length, it is 800 millimeters wide. It’s also worth noting that there are no ends or transfers between both end pulleys. Bottom line – this puppy is a far cry from the conveyor belt that sends your goods down to the bagger at the grocery store.
  • Western Sahara: Said to be today’s largest conveyor belt system in the world, this one in the Western Sahara encompasses some 98 kilometers (or 61 miles) in length. Specifically, it was constructed to transport phosphate rocks from mines in Bou Craa to the port city of El-Aaiun, whether the product can then be exported around the world, mainly to be used as an ingredient in the likes of lawn and yard fertilizers. It’s said that this conveyor system can transport up to 2,000 metric tons of rock per hour. It’s visible from outer space, which goes to give you an indication of how massive it truly is. Also interesting to note is that the desert in the vicinity of the conveyor system also has a blue-colored tint to it from all the phosphate that has been blown off of the belt system by the wind over the years. The blue colored desert can also be seen from space.
  • Peru: It’s said to be the world’s largest pipe conveyor belt, and it rests in Peru – but this conveyor belt happens to be quite the engineering feat. You see, because Lima, Peru’s streets are more narrow than other streets around the rest of the world, the conveyor belt had to be designed and manufactured ever so carefully to conform to them. Today, it’s 16.4 kilometers long and works to bring cement clinker – and at a temperature of 80 degrees Celsius no less – from a cement plant down to the harbor where it can be exported. On its return trip, the belt brings coal and limestone back to the cement plant. The belt’s long stretch is about 8.2 kilometers long, about 6.5 kilometers of it which flows underneath the narrow streets of Lima. A pipe belt was the only way to accomplish the task at hand, notably because it can be built on rough terrain, maneuver tight corners with greater ease and minimize interaction between environment and material being shipped. What’s more is the ability to run this pipe conveyor belt underneath Lima’s streets means that shipping traffic can be reduced on ground level.
  • Andes Mountains: Although still big, this conveyor belt in the Chilean Andes is not the largest in the world. Instead, it holds the world record of being the steepest in the world, with an elevation of nearly 16,000 feet. Specifically, this belt services the Collahuasi mine complex in the mountain range, and building it to handle this type of steep terrain was a necessity in order to adequately transport the product.
  • Dublin, Ireland: Built in 1941, the conveyor belt that encompassed hills, valleys and roads in Dublin, Ireland was once the largest in the world. Although estimates varied on how big and how long the belt actually was, its purpose was clear – to deliver stones to the then-site of theShaster Dam during the time of its construction. The belt, fittingly, was removed following the construction of the dam.
  • Montalieu, France: Known as the largest conveyor belt in all of Europe, the 6.2 kilometer belt inMontalieu, France is designed to carry limestone from a quarry to a cement factory several kilometers away. The belt is powered by three electric motors and can move up to 1,000 tons of product at a time. The belt itself weighs 250 tons. The belt was initiated in November 2014 and is still active today.
  • Rockdale, Texas: At a coal mine in Rockdale, Texas, rests a 19-kilometer long conveyor belt that is designed to easily and efficiently transport coal from the mine to the city of Rockdale. Like several others on this list, parts of this conveyor belt are required to pass underneath the terrain or on very uneven terrain to get product to where it needs to go. The benefits of a belt like this for a purpose like this are its ability to supply coal around the clock – and to supply it affordably.

When you think of a conveyor belt, you might just think of a line that works inside an assembly plant or factory – not one that crosses deserts, flows underneath city streets or descends down from mountains. But these conveyor belts listed here just go to show you how flexible these systems are and what kind of potential they have. For more information on conveyor belts contact Bid on Equipment today.

October 2015 Trends Report

What has been bringing buyers to Bid on Equipment through the month of October and what are they looking for when they are here? This last month we noticed a large increase in interest in Electric Motors.
 
Below are the top ten search terms that have shown the largest increases from Internet search traffic this month.

 

Interest in each of these terms has grown 100% – 2000%!

Used Walk In Cooler For Sale Restaurant Equipment For Sale
Used Woodworking Tools Used Air Compressors For Sale
Used Bakery Equipment Used Warehouse Equipment
Used Machine Shop Tools Used Printing Equipment
Milling Machine For Sale Boilers For Sale
 
The top ten overall categories for Bid on Equipment in the last month.
Woodworking Equipment Boilers
Bakery Equipment Tanks
Machine Shop and Tools Lathes
Dairy Equipment Meat Equipment
Conveyors Welding Equipment
 
The top ten overall Manufacturer Pages for Bid on Equipment in the last month.
Bridgeport Combi
Cleaver Brooks Hussman
Bakers Pride Bertolaso
Miller Alto Shaam
Waukesha Bosch

Are there categories that you would like to see on Bid on Equipment? Or information you would like to see in future emails? Email us at [email protected]

Learn About Popcorn Poppers

When you think of popcorn, the first thing that probably comes to your mind is a movie theater. After all, popcorn just so happens to be the preferred snack while you’re taking in the latest flick at the local multiplex. And as you’d might imagine, movie theaters are one of the main locales for the larger, industrial popcorn poppers that can make the tasty treat in large amounts.

While movie theaters are most synonymous with popcorn, there are a number of other venues that need the same type of commercial, industrial equipment to mass produce the snack. Think of places like sports arenas, concert venues, high-production food processing facilities and more. But on the note of how the popcorn is actually produced, there’s a variety of different equipment to get the job done. Here’s a closer look at some of these different styles of equipment to better help you get a feel for the type of popcorn poppers that are out there today:

  • Giant poppers: These types of machines are generally made of stainless steel, and usually consists of several feet of space. The stainless steel makeup of the machine ensures that the equipment will not rust, which can be a big benefit, especially when oils are brought into the equation. These giant poppers generally have an area for kettle install, as well as a chute that takes processed popcorn to a storage container for packaging and transport. While able to produce a large amount of popcorn, these poppers are generally still compact enough to fit into a backroom.
  • Rotary Dry Popcorn Popper: These types of machines are best utilized on trailers, stands and in portable concessions stands, as they are small and compact, yet effective. Available in electric and gas varieties, these types of poppers are normally made of stainless steel and include galvanized sheet metal throughout the interior to maximize heat application. Most rotary dry popcorn units can hold up to 10 gallons of kernels and pop over 30 pounds of popcorn per hour.
  • Electric Dry Popcorn Popper: These are similar to the rotary dry popcorn poppers that we mentioned above in that they’re compact (yet probably a better fit for a backroom rather than a trailer or portable stand), made of steel and effective. One neat feature on most of these types of models, however, is that they automatically dispose of unpopped kernels into a waste drawer during the reversal of the cylinder.
  • Enclosed Machines: Available from manufacturers such as Coronado, these massive popcorn poppers are ideal for the likes of sports stadiums that must serve a lot of people within a brief window of time. So, as you might imagine, they’re best utilized in the backroom concession areas of such facilities, as they are not the most portable of popcorn poppers currently on the market today. These enclosed units typically include an oil pump, a large cabinet where the popping is actually done, a drive motor, warmer to keep the food hot over long periods of time and a heat diffuser to ensure that there’s even heating – and thereby efficient popping – for kernels no matter where they are located. These machines are typically constructed from stainless steel and come in a range of sizes to suit just about any venue.
  • Open Machines: There are enclosed popcorn poppers, and then there are open popcorn poppers. And while we covered the enclosed type in the above section (which are ideal for open venues and sports stadiums), open machines are better utilized in venues and forums where the building is covered. Like enclosed machines, these types of poppers come in a wide variety of different cabinet sizes to meet the needs of any venue. And also like enclosed poppers, these machines aren’t easily moved, which is why they’re best utilized in the back concession areas of sports stadiums, concert halls and other large venues. Finally, like their enclosed counterparts, this type of popcorn popper is among the most expensive that you can buy on the market. Typical price tags for brand new enclosed and open poppers can range up to $10,000 in price.

It’s also worth noting that when it comes to popcorn poppers, let alone any other type of commercial, industrial equipment piece, they’re not inexpensive to come by. You can see that just from the enclosed and open popper sections that we mentioned above, and certainly the same can be said of the other options that are presented on this list. Yes, depending on the size and style of the equipment, new machines can range in price anywhere from a few thousand dollars to well into the tens of thousands of dollars. Needless to say, but for many companies, no matter whether an existing popcorn machine has unexpectedly broken or it be trying to get into the business of popcorn production, this can be a lofty expense.

And that’s why if you’re ever in the market for a popcorn popper and don’t quite have the capital to buy brand new, you should consider going the used route. When doing business with a credible venue, such as Bid on Equipment, you can ensure that you’re getting like-new equipment at a used price. This is a win-win for you, as you don’t have to break the bank getting your operations kick started and can still rest assured that you’re getting a good product.

For more information on popcorn popping equipment, and to browse Bid on Equipment’s selection of used machines in stock, contact the company or visit it online today.

September 2015 Trends

What has been bringing buyers to Bid on Equipment through the month of September and what are they looking for when they are here? This last month we noticed a large increase in interest inMachine Shop and Tools including Lathes,Grinding Machines, and Machining Centers.

The top ten Internet Search terms leading to Bid on Equipment this month

Used Walk In Cooler For Sale Restaurant Equipment For Sale
Used Woodworking Tools Used Air Compressors For Sale
Used Bakery Equipment Used Dairy Equipment
Used Conveyors Used Printing Equipment
Milling Machine For Sale Boilers For Sale
 
The top ten overall categories for Bid on Equipment in the last month.
Woodworking Equipment HVAC Equipment
Bakery Equipment Boilers
Machine Shop and Tools Lathes
Dairy Equipment Meat Equipment
Milk Tanks Walk In Freezers
 
The top ten Manufacturer Pages for Bid on Equipment in the last month.
Bridgeport Hussman
Mojonnier Flexicon
Wheelabrator Sweco
Cleaver Brooks Waukesha
Alto Shaam Bosch

August 2015 Trends Report

What has been bringing buyers to Bid on Equipment through the month of August and what are they looking for when they are here? This last month we noticed a large increase in interest in Machine Shop and Tools including Lathes,Grinding Machines, and Machining Centers.

 

Below are the top ten search that have shown the largest increases from Internet search traffic this month.

Interest in each of these terms has grown 170% – 1100%!

 
Used Walk In Cooler For Sale Used Wastewater Treatment Equipment
Used Meat Grinder Used Shrink Wrap Machine For Sale
Used Ribbon Blender Used Dust Collectors
Walk In Freezer For Sale Used Bagging Equipment
Stainless Steel Totes For Sale Boilers For Sale
 
The top ten overall categories for Bid on Equipment in the last month.
 
Woodworking Equipment HVAC Equipment
Bakery Equipment Tanks
Machine Shop and Tools Lathes
Dairy Equipment Welding and Soldering Equipment
Restaurant Equipment Walk In Freezers
 
The top ten overall Manufacturer Pages for Bid on Equipment in the last month.
 
Bridgeport Uniloy
Trane Lincoln
Wheelabrator Miller
Belshaw Multivac
Heidelberg Label Aire